Bank Updates – Fall 2018

Two conservation banks in Yolo County, and a third in San Bernardino County have made progress in the preservation of vulnerable and endangered species. Learn more about which species are being protected, as well as the preservation credit situation for each bank.

Fremont Landing Conservation Bank

Yolo County, California

With the fifth and final year of the Bank’s establishment period annual monitoring under our belt, we are proud to report that all success period performance standards have been met at the Fremont Landing Conservation Bank. As a result, National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) granted the final release of conservation credits in 2018. Wildlands established the Bank to provide habitat for federally listed endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon, threatened Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon, threatened Central Valley steelhead, candidate Central Valley fall/ late fall-run Chinook salmon. The Bank’s design included the creation of off-channel backwater oxbow-type rearing habitat for juvenile fish including salmon by connecting the abandoned borrow pits to the river. Inundated floodplains along a river can provide crucial feeding, rearing, and refuge habitat for fish and other wildlife species. The creation of channels to the river provide greater access to these off-channel rearing riparian habitats and reduce the threat of stranding. Fish monitoring surveys conducted annually by the Fishery Foundation of California continue to demonstrate the site’s success. The Foundation most recently reported that all created channels on-site revealed the presence of fish, including spring-run and fall-run Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Preservation credits are now sold out; however, riparian forest floodplain restoration credits are available now for your project’s compensatory mitigation needs. Please contact us for a quote or for more information.

Liberty Island Conservation Bank

Yolo County, California

Wildlands established the 148-acre Liberty Island Conservation Bank in 2010 to provide habitat and off-site compensatory mitigation credits for permitted impacts to native Delta fish species, including listed Delta smelt, longfin smelt and Central Valley anadromous salmonids. Located in the southern Yolo Bypass area of the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta, the Bank is approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).

The Bank generated both preservation and restoration credits for use by permittees; however, we have completely sold out of Delta smelt preservation credits, and are running low on our Delta smelt/longfin smelt restoration credit inventory. Please contact us today for your short and long-term mitigation needs. Keep an eye out for the Wildlands’ North Delta Fish Conservation Bank – coming soon to expand availability of the native Delta fish credit inventory.

Lytle Creek Conservation Bank

San Bernardino County, California

The Lytle Creek Conservation Bank was established in 2014 to provide USFWS-approved San Bernardino kangaroo rat (SBKR) and Santa Ana River woollystar (SARW) habitat credits within the Service Area of San Bernardino County.

The Bank site is comprised of Riversidean Alluvial Fan Sage Scrub (RAFSS) habitat, including active creek channel. RAFSS is considered by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) to be a rare plant community that requires mitigation under California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The active channel of Lytle Creek and the adjacent RAFSS habitat are also regulated under Fish and Game Code Section 1602 as stream and riparian habitat. The Bank is currently under CDFW review for consideration as compensatory mitigation for State permitted impacts to SBKR and SARW, and for RAFSS and stream habitat impacts regulated under CEQA and Fish and Game Code Section 1602.

Please contact us today to discuss your current and future mitigation needs in San Bernardino County.